Workshops and Student Resources

Tales from the Wood

The New Plantation in Early Summer

As spring turns into summer, the new plantation has really started to flourish. it’s just over 4 years ago now since the finger-height saplings were planted, and It’s difficult to remember the dark and lifeless Read more…

Tawny Owlet

Just managed to catch this charming little owlet before it popped back into the nest box. She looks ready for branching, so will be soon scrabbling about in the trees close by. I’m not sure Read more…

Reed Sculpture at Hickling

A lovely spring day at Norfolk Wildlife Trust’s Hickling Reserve. We started the day practising knots and learning how to handle and grade Norfolk reed. This was followed up by some very impressive sculptural constructions. Read more…

Bracken Whipping

Bracken can dominate a new plantation, outcompeting young saplings and collapsing onto tree guards in autumn bringing them to the ground. There is plenty of evidence that crushing the bracken stems with a tractor-driven roller Read more…

Next Winter’s Log Stack

A bit late with the log stack this year, but with the best of the drying weather still to come, it should be just fine. Technically, the log stack is built in a windrow configuration, Read more…

Birch Bark

Looking ahead to the workshop for the Norfolk Wildlife Trust, I thought it a good idea to make a short reconnaissance visit to the Hickling Reserve, just to see what materials are available. Lots to Read more…

Willow Bindings

Down by Foxes Beck, a tangle of willow scrub emerges from the waterlogged banks. The inner bark, or more precisely, ‘the cambium layer’, is a fine material for bindings. Either raw, or retted (boiled in Read more…

Bramble Bindings

Thinking ahead to the ‘Wild Jewellery’ event I’m running for the Norfolk Wildlife Trust, I thought I’d see how last year’s bramble growth behaved for simple bindings. Quite tough to ‘thread’ (peeling off the vicious Read more…

Regenerative Birch and Besom Brooms

Thousands of self-set birch have appeared in the new plantation, with some, crowding out the sweet chestnut and oak. They need to be thinned, and this provides a good opportunity to collect the side stems Read more…